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Your search on Collection contains 'National Park Service Facebook Photos' returned 3985 results, Showing page 1 of 67, Items 1 through 60

The Rathdown crew, San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park, 1892.. Exact date unknown. Pictured: some of the officers, apprentices and crew of the British square-rigged ship, the Rathdown. This photo was taken in San Francisco in 1892 after the crew had completed a six-month voyage around Cape Horn from Belfast, Ireland. The Rathdown was built in Ireland in 1891 and was 30-feet longer, 11-feet wider and 400-tons bigger than the Balclutha. This ship was last seen leaving Yokohama, Japan on October 4, 1900. Image K9.28,157.

The Rathdown crew, San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park, 1892.

Corinthian Yatch Club members, San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park, 1889.. Corinthian Yatch Club members celebrate the end of the 1889 season. Image B12.01461p.

Corinthian Yatch Club members, San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park, 1889.

zebra, Manassas National Battlefield Park, 2014.. zebra

zebra, Manassas National Battlefield Park, 2014.

white tailed, Mississippi National River & Recreation Area, 2015.. white tailed

white tailed, Mississippi National River & Recreation Area, 2015.

Pileated woodpecker (Hylatomus pileatus), Catoctin Mountain Park, 2015.. To locate the pileated woodpecker, look for large, oval holes in dying trees where the bird has been searching for its meals. Though often confused with the ivory-billed woodpecker (campephilus principalis), the pileated woodpecker is smaller and easily-recognized by its flaming red crest. NOTE: The ivory-billed woodpecker is likely extinct.

Pileated woodpecker (Hylatomus pileatus), Catoctin Mountain Park, 2015.

Pileated woodpecker (Hylatomus pileatus), Catoctin Mountain Park, 2015.. To locate the pileated woodpecker, look for large, oval holes in dying trees where the bird has been searching for its meals. Though often confused with the ivory-billed woodpecker (campephilus principalis), the pileated woodpecker is smaller and easily-recognized by its flaming red crest. NOTE: The ivory-billed woodpecker is likely extinct.

Pileated woodpecker (Hylatomus pileatus), Catoctin Mountain Park, 2015.

Pileated woodpecker (Hylatomus pileatus), Fort Washington Park, 2014.. This large, distinctive woodpecker doesn't migrate and should be fairly easy to spot in leafless trees during winter. To locate the pileated woodpecker, look for large, oval holes in dying trees where the bird has been searching for its meals. Though often confused with the ivory-billed woodpecker (campephilus principalis), the pileated woodpecker is smaller and easily-recognized by its flaming red crest. NOTE: The ivory-billed woodpecker is likely extinct.

Pileated woodpecker (Hylatomus pileatus), Fort Washington Park, 2014.

Wolf spider (Lycosidae), Catoctin Mountain Park, 2014.. Most wolf spiders don't spin webs. Instead, they live on the ground and hunt at night. Wolf spiders are also unique in the way they carry their eggs. A wolf spider's round, silken globe egg sac is attached by spinnerets to her abdomen. She must walk in a raised position but this allows the spider to carry her unborn young with her! Female spiders are even still capable of hunting while carrying her egg sac. Immediately after the spiderlings emerge from the protective silken case, they climb up the mother's legs and crowd together in a cute little pile on her abdomen.

Wolf spider (Lycosidae), Catoctin Mountain Park, 2014.

Snowy plover (Charadrius nivosus) broken wing display, Gulf Islands National Seashore, 2015.. Snowy plovers are attentive, protective parents and perform this broken wing display to lure potential predators from its egg nest or hatchlings. If you see a bird performing this display, you should move slowly and carefully leave the area. That bird is simply trying to protect its nest or hatchlings from a threat -- you.

Snowy plover (Charadrius nivosus) broken wing display, Gulf Islands National Seashore, 2015.

Turtles (Testudines) basking on a fallen tree, National Capital Parks - East, 2014..

Turtles (Testudines) basking on a fallen tree, National Capital Parks - East, 2014.

Green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) hatchling, Cape Lookout National Seashore, 2015.. In 2015, we had a total of 247 sea turtle nests across the entire National Seashore, breaking the previous record of 242. The vast majority of these nests belong to loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) but we also had 14 green sea turtle nests. Green sea turtle hatchlings are larger than loggerhead hatchlings, with a black body and white trim. When this green sea turtle hatchling grows up, it could reach an amazing 700 pounds!

Green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) hatchling, Cape Lookout National Seashore, 2015.

Common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina), Cape Hatteras National Seashore, 2015.. With strong claws, a long tail and saw-toothed keels (i.e., a single, pair or triple ridge that runs from front to back), the snapping turtle is a great swimmer. True to its name, the snapping turtle also has a powerful bite! This animal resides in the water unless nesting.

Common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina), Cape Hatteras National Seashore, 2015.

Wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo), Cape Cod National Seashore, 2015.. At the time of colonial settlement, wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) were found almost throughout Massachusetts. As settlement progressed and land was cleared for buildings and agriculture, turkey populations diminished. By 1800, turkeys were rare in Massachusetts and by 1851 they had disappeared completely. In 1972 the Commonwealth of Massachusetts began a restoration effort in cooperation with the State of New York of trapping turkeys in southwestern NY and releasing them in Berkshire County. By 1976 the birds had established themselves to the point that there were sufficient numbers in Berkshire Co. to trap and release across the rest of the state, including 28 birds in Wellfleet in 1995. The eastern wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo silvestris) is now a common sight on the outer Cape.

Wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo), Cape Cod National Seashore, 2015.

Spring blooms, National Capital Parks - East, 2014..

Spring blooms, National Capital Parks - East, 2014.

Fall campground, Greenbelt Park, 2015..

Fall campground, Greenbelt Park, 2015.

Tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor), Assateague Island National Seashore, 2015.. Tree swallows were given this common name because, probably not surprisingly, of their nesting preference for tree cavities. These territorial little birds will go to great lengths to chase away intruders - even tree swallow intruders! When nesting season is over, that territorial behavior disappears and they become very social animals (as seen in this photo.) At Assateague Island National Seashore, these birds head out to the beach or marsh in huge groups after nesting season. An excess of resources - insects, bayberry and red cedar berries - means they no longer need to defend a territory and will tolerate huge numbers of fellow tree swallows. As other flocks migrate through the area they may also join the group! As they journey further south for winter, the bulging flock may continue to grow into hundreds or even thousands of birds.

Tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor), Assateague Island National Seashore, 2015.

Fall colors on the Perimeter Trail Bridge, Greenbelt Park, 2015.. Perimeter Trail is 5.3 miles long and begins at the park entrance.

Fall colors on the Perimeter Trail Bridge, Greenbelt Park, 2015.

Fall colors on the Perimeter Trail, Greenbelt Park, 2015.. Perimeter Trail is 5.3 miles long and begins at the park entrance.

Fall colors on the Perimeter Trail, Greenbelt Park, 2015.

Hatchling tracks toward the ocean, Cape Hatteras National Seashore, 2015..

Hatchling tracks toward the ocean, Cape Hatteras National Seashore, 2015.

Hatchling tracks toward the ocean, Cape Hatteras National Seashore, 2015..

Hatchling tracks toward the ocean, Cape Hatteras National Seashore, 2015.

Shallows at low tide, Fire Island National Seashore, 2015..

Shallows at low tide, Fire Island National Seashore, 2015.

Sunrise and sailboats, Cumberland Island National Seashore, 2015..

Sunrise and sailboats, Cumberland Island National Seashore, 2015.

Sunrise at north beach, Padre Island National Seashore, 2015..

Sunrise at north beach, Padre Island National Seashore, 2015.

Sunset at the shore, Gulf Islands National Seashore, 2015..

Sunset at the shore, Gulf Islands National Seashore, 2015.

Sunlight through the forest canopy, Catoctin Mountain Park, 2014..

Sunlight through the forest canopy, Catoctin Mountain Park, 2014.

Korean War Veteran Memorial, National Mall and Memorial Parks, 2015..

Korean War Veteran Memorial, National Mall and Memorial Parks, 2015.

Roseate spoonbill (Platalea ajaja), Cumberland Island National Seashore, 2015.. Roseate spoonbills are gregarious wading birds, related to the ibis. Along with herons, they feed in the shallows of fresh or coastal waters, often in groups. Rather than a piercing beak like a heron, the spoon-shaped bill allows it to sift through mud.

Roseate spoonbill (Platalea ajaja), Cumberland Island National Seashore, 2015.

Snowy egret (Egretta thula), Cumberland Island National Seashore, 2015.. This little white heron had a population crisis when its beautiful plumes were in demand by market hunters as decorations for women's hats. Now protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act the population has recovered. Snowy egrets nest in colonies in isolated places like barrier islands and marshes, often changing location from the previous year. Distinguish this white heron from other egrets or herons by its distinctive yellow feet with black legs as well as the yellow area in front of the eyes and on the upper part of its black bill that turns red during breeding season.

Snowy egret (Egretta thula), Cumberland Island National Seashore, 2015.

Snow-covered tree, Cape Cod National Seashore, 2015..

Snow-covered tree, Cape Cod National Seashore, 2015.

Snow-covered tree, Cape Cod National Seashore, 2015..

Snow-covered tree, Cape Cod National Seashore, 2015.

Snow-covered tree, Cape Cod National Seashore, 2015..

Snow-covered tree, Cape Cod National Seashore, 2015.

Winter campground, Greenbelt Park, 2015.. Snow-covered campground.

Winter campground, Greenbelt Park, 2015.

Ornate snipe fly (Chrysolpolis ornatus), Catoctin Mountain Park, 2014.. Like other flies in the Rhagionidae family, orante snipe flies have tapered bodies and stilt-like legs. Though beautiful, adult flies have mouthparts adapted for piercing; some are predatory on other insects while others attack humans and other large animals.

Ornate snipe fly (Chrysolpolis ornatus), Catoctin Mountain Park, 2014.

Easter diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus), Gulf Islands National Seashore, 2015.. This pit viper is found in the southeastern part of the country and is actually the heaviest venomous snake in the Americas. Because of its size, it is able to eat prey as large as fully grown cottontail rabbits! Maybe even more amazing, these excellent swimmers have been seen swimming miles away from land to reach barrier islands off the coast of Georgia, the Gulf of Mexico and even in the Florida Keys.

Easter diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus), Gulf Islands National Seashore, 2015.

Aerial view, Fort Washington Park, 2015..

Aerial view, Fort Washington Park, 2015.

Sunset over the water, Fort Washington Park, 2013..

Sunset over the water, Fort Washington Park, 2013.

Birds flying down the beach, Padre Island National Seashore, 2015..

Birds flying down the beach, Padre Island National Seashore, 2015.

Black skimmers (Rynchops niger), Cape Hatteras National Seashore, 2015.. This tern-like seabird is the largest of the skimmers. The black skimmer breeds on sandbanks or sandy beaches in the Americas. Like other birds that nest on beaches, the chicks have amazing camouflage and will leave the nest almost as soon as they hatch. Interestingly, the mandibles of hatchlings are the same length but rapidly become unequal during the fledging stage.

Black skimmers (Rynchops niger), Cape Hatteras National Seashore, 2015.

Precocial chick on the beach, Cape Lookout National Seashore, 2015.. Please keep your distance from wildlife. Take photos with a telephoto lens.

Precocial chick on the beach, Cape Lookout National Seashore, 2015.

Waves crashing on the shore, Cape Lookout National Seashore, 2015..

Waves crashing on the shore, Cape Lookout National Seashore, 2015.

Story seas crash onto the beach, Fire Island National Seashore, 2015..

Story seas crash onto the beach, Fire Island National Seashore, 2015.

Sunny beach, Cape Cod National Seashore, 2015..

Sunny beach, Cape Cod National Seashore, 2015.

Sunny beach, Canaveral National Seashore, 2015..

Sunny beach, Canaveral National Seashore, 2015.

Bivalves and starfish on the shore, Cape Lookout National Seashore, 2015..

Bivalves and starfish on the shore, Cape Lookout National Seashore, 2015.

Seals swimming together, Cape Cod National Seashore, 2015.. Before hauling out to rest at low tide on sandbars at High Head in Truro and Coast Guard Beach in Eastham, hundreds of seals will swim together (there is safety in numbers!) Sharks and seals have always inhabited these waters and seals are the shark's main source of food. Be shark-smart: avoid isolation and limit splashing, don't wear shiny jewelry, don't swim near seals, swim close to shore where your feet touch the bottom, don't swim alone at dusk or dawn and don't forget to swim, kayak and surf in groups. These animals are protected by law -- DO NOT APPROACH any closer than 50 yards (think of 1/2 a football field) on shore or in the water, on foot, swimming or in watercraft. Remain off sandbars when seals are on them.

Seals swimming together, Cape Cod National Seashore, 2015.

Seals gathering to rest, Cape Cod National Seashore, 2015.. Hundreds of seals haul out to rest at low tide on sandbars at High Head in Truro and Coast Guard Beach in Eastham. Staff and volunteers at both locations are happy to share binoculars and information to help you enjoy this natural event. These animals are protected by law --DO NOT APPROACH any closer than 50 yards (think of 1/2 a football field) on shore or in the water, on foot, swimming or in watercraft. Remain off sandbars when seals are on them.

Seals gathering to rest, Cape Cod National Seashore, 2015.

Grey seal (Halichoerus grypus), Fire Island National Seashore, 2015.. The grey seal goes by many names, including Atlantic seal, gray seal and horsehead seal. Today, it isn't unusual to see a healthy seal like this pup resting on the beach for hours at a time. In the past, however, grey seals were hunted nearly to extinction. According to a survey of the entire Maine coast conducted in 1972, only 30 grey seals remained. It was in that year that Congress passed the Marine Mammal Protection Act, preventing the harming or harrassing of all marine mammals, including seals. Since the passing of this act, sightings of grey seals have increased. These animals are still federally-protected and should be left alone. However, if you see an injured animal, call the Riverhead Foundation for Marine Research and Preservation hotline 631-369-9829.

Grey seal (Halichoerus grypus), Fire Island National Seashore, 2015.

Loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta), Gulf Islands National Seashore, 2015.. The end of summer means sea turtle hatchlings will be crawling out of their nests and making their way home to the ocean. This tiny loggerhead hatchling may grow to an amazing 250 pounds by adulthood. These amazing animals even have the ability to hold their breath underwater for up to 7-hours while sleeping.

Loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta), Gulf Islands National Seashore, 2015.

Moon snail (Clypeasteroida) and sand collar, Assateague Island National Seashore, 2015.. This strange half-moon shaped object is just the egg mass of the moon snail. The female lays thousands of eggs at one time and creates the sand collar as a form of protection for them. Basically, she constucts this collar by burying herself in the sand and, with the sand still covering her, she uses mucous to bind each grain of sand to another grain of sand! This forms a flexible layer surrounding her shell. Then she distributes her eggs evenly between the first layer of sand and her shell. Finally, another layer of sand is bound together in the same manner as the first and laid over the eggs of the first layer. This unique process sandwiches the eggs inside a protective case. These collars are buried just below the sand's surface but unfortunately they are often dislodged and washed up on the beaches. IMPORTANT: if you find one that has eggs exposed but is still wet, throw it back into the water so they have a chance to survive!

Moon snail (Clypeasteroida) and sand collar, Assateague Island National Seashore, 2015.

Rocket taking off, Canaveral National Seashore, 2015..

Rocket taking off, Canaveral National Seashore, 2015.

Japanese wineberry (Rubus phoenicolasius), Catoctin Mountain Park, 2014.. Perhaps not surprisingly, after being introduced as an ornamental plant, the hearty wineberry escaped cultivation to become a very successful invasive spceies in Europe and North America. Wherever found, this non-native wineberry displaces native plants and alters habitat structure. Without a poisonous look-alike in North America, it's also one of the most easily identifiable wild edible plants.

Japanese wineberry (Rubus phoenicolasius), Catoctin Mountain Park, 2014.

Red evening sky, Cape Lookout National Seashore, 2015..

Red evening sky, Cape Lookout National Seashore, 2015.

Timber rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus), Catoctin Mountain Park, 2015.. Interestingly, this is the only snake in Maryland with a rattle. The timber rattlesnake is the second most northerly-distributed venomous snake in North America (the first is its cousin in the west, the prairie rattlesnake). This snake has long fangs, an impressive build and high venom yield; however, it also has a mild disposition and long brumation (i.e., dormancy in reptiles) time. This species is shy and prefers to avoid areas frequented by humans. However, it will readily bite if provoked. So, keep your distance.

Timber rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus), Catoctin Mountain Park, 2015.

Reflection on the pond, National Capital Parks - East, 2013..

Reflection on the pond, National Capital Parks - East, 2013.

Semipalmated plover (Charadrius semipalmatus), Cape Hatteras National Seashore, 2015.. The name 'semipalmated' refers to this animal's partly-webbed feet. Some semipalmated plovers travel all the way from the Cape, the Caribbean or even South America to their summer spots in Canada and Alaska. This bird resembles the killdeer but is much smaller and has only one band. Like other plovers, this bird nests on the ground and exhibits the 'broken-wing' display to protect its nest from intruders.

Semipalmated plover (Charadrius semipalmatus), Cape Hatteras National Seashore, 2015.

Piping plover (Charadrius melodus) on a scrape, Assateague Island National Seashore, 2015.. Piping plovers are among the first migratory shorebirds to return to Assateague after a long winter. The males arrive early in March, usually a few weeks ahead of females. If he had a successful nest the previous year he will claim his old territory. The female will also return to their old nesting area - though she won't always mate with the same male! While preparing for breeding season, the male creates a scrape (i.e., the nest) by literally scraping out a little nest in the sand. To create a suitable depression he hunches down and repositions himself repeatedly while kicking out the sand. He even uses his chest to smooth out the ground while he moves from side to side. In an effort to attract the attention of any nearby females, he also calls continuously during the scrape-building activities. If there is no female interest in his scrape, he may sit in the scrape for a short period before flying off to try again in a new location!

Piping plover (Charadrius melodus) on a scrape, Assateague Island National Seashore, 2015.

Bush found in the park, Catoctin Mountain Park, 2015..

Bush found in the park, Catoctin Mountain Park, 2015.

Common buckeye (Junonia coenia), Assateague Island National Seashore, 2015.. Adults feed on nectar and take fluids from mud or damp sand. Males perch on the ground or low plants, occasionally looking for females. This species is not territorial. The bold eyespots and bars on the upper wing are distinctive in much of its range (except for other species in the same genus). The eyespots are likely a form of mimicry and used to startle or distract predators, especially young birds.

Common buckeye (Junonia coenia), Assateague Island National Seashore, 2015.

Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda), Cape Lookout National Seashore, 2015.. Ice from an overnight storm of freezing rain covers this loblolly pine. The common name 'loblolly' comes from this pine species preference for lowlands and swampy areas.

Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda), Cape Lookout National Seashore, 2015.

Stone jetty, Cape Cod National Seashore, 2015.. Groins and jetties are shore-perpendicular structures built along a shoreline to hold sand in place. Groins are smaller structures built to trap sand and stabilize a sandy beach, typically made of steel, timber or stone. Jetties are large structures typcally used to stabilize inlet channels. Both structures interrupt longshore sand transport and accrete sand on their updrift side while erosion occurs on their downdrift side.

Stone jetty, Cape Cod National Seashore, 2015.